Antique Imperial Russian

Antique 18th Century Imperial Russian Porcelain Factory Plate Tsar Paul Romanov

Antique 18th Century Imperial Russian Porcelain Factory Plate Tsar Paul Romanov
Antique 18th Century Imperial Russian Porcelain Factory Plate Tsar Paul Romanov
Antique 18th Century Imperial Russian Porcelain Factory Plate Tsar Paul Romanov
Antique 18th Century Imperial Russian Porcelain Factory Plate Tsar Paul Romanov
Antique 18th Century Imperial Russian Porcelain Factory Plate Tsar Paul Romanov
Antique 18th Century Imperial Russian Porcelain Factory Plate Tsar Paul Romanov
Antique 18th Century Imperial Russian Porcelain Factory Plate Tsar Paul Romanov

Antique 18th Century Imperial Russian Porcelain Factory Plate Tsar Paul Romanov

Bibelotslondon Ltd is a UK registered company based in London Bridge dealing in ephemera and curiosities from Britain and around the world. Our diverse inventory is carefully chosen and constantly evolving. We work very hard to offer the highest quality works at competitive prices.

Our inventory is listed online, and we strive to keep our website completely up to date, so our customers can easily check availability. We believe in offering clients items that are unique and rare for aficionados of the antique and collector's world. Bibelot is a late nineteenth century word derived from the French word bel beautiful, meaning a small item of beauty, curiosity or interest. The word ephemera is derived from the sixteenth century Greek word ephmera meaning a printed or hand written paper not meant to be retained for a long period of time. No cracks, chips or restoration.

Paul was born in the Palace of Empress Elisabeth, St Petersburg. His father, the future Emperor Paul III, was the nephew and heir apparent of the Empress. His mother, born the daughter of a minor German prince, was later to depose her own husband (Paul's father) and reign in her own right as Catherine II, known to history as Catherine the Great. Paul was taken almost immediately after birth from his mother by the Empress Elizabeth, whose overwhelming attention may have done him more harm than good.

As a boy, he was reported to be intelligent and good-looking. His pug-nosed facial features in later life are attributed to an attack of typhus. Empress Elizabeth died in 1762, when Paul was 8 years old, and he became crown prince with the accession of his father to the throne as Peter III. However, within a matter of months, Paul's mother engineered a coup and not only deposed her husband but, for a long time, was believed to have gotten him killed by her supporters. It was later found that Peter III probably died due to a fit of apoplexy when exerting himself in a dispute with Prince Feodor, one of his jailers. Some historians believe that he was murdered by a vindictive Alexei Orlov. After the death of Peter III, Catherine then placed herself on the throne in a surpassingly grand and ostentatious coronation ceremony, for which event the Russian Imperial Crown was crafted by court jewellers. The 8-year-old Paul retained his position as crown prince. Catherine and her son and heir Paul maintained a distant relationship throughout her reign. The aunt of Catherine's husband, Empress Elisabeth. Took up the child as a passing fancy.

Elizabeth proved an obsessive but incapable caretaker, as she had raised no children of her own. Paul was supervised by a variety of caregivers.

Catherine's absolute power and the delicate balance of courtier status greatly influenced the relationship at Court with Paul, who openly disregarded his mother's opinions. Paul adamantly protested his mother's policies, writing a veiled criticism in his. A dissertation on military reform.

In it he directly disparaged expansionist warfare in favour of a more defensive military policy. Unenthusiastically received by his mother. Appeared a threat to her authority and added weight to her suspicion of an internal conspiracy with Paul at its centre. For a courtier to have openly supported or shown intimacy towards Paul, especially following this publication, would have meant political suicide. Paul spent the following years away from the Imperial Court, content to remain at his private estates at Gatchina with his growing family and perform Prussian drill exercises.

As Catherine grew older, she became less concerned that her son attend court functions; her attentions focused primarily on the future Emperor Alexander I. Catherine suffered a stroke on 17 November 1796, and died without regaining consciousness. Paul's first act as Emperor was to inquire about and, if possible, destroy her testament, as he feared it would exclude him from succession and leave the throne to Alexander. These fears may have contributed to Paul's promulgation of the Pauline Laws, which established the strict principle of primogeniture in the House of Romanov. Leaving the throne to the next male heir.

The army, then poised to attack Persia in accordance with Catherine's last design, was recalled to the capital within one month of Paul's accession. His father Peter was reburied with great pomp at the royal sepulchre in the Peter and Paul Cathedral. His attempts to force the nobility. To adopt a code of chivalry. Alienated many of his trusted advisors.

The Emperor also discovered outrageous machinations and corruption. Although he repealed Catherine's law allowing corporal punishment.

Of the free classes, directed reforms that resulted in greater rights for the peasantry. And provided for better treatment for serfs. On agricultural estates, most of his policies were viewed as a great annoyance to the noble class and induced his enemies to work out a plan of action. Was organised, some months before it was executed, by Counts Peter Ludwig von Der Pahlen and Nikita Petrovich Panin and Admiral de Ribas.

The death of de Ribas in December 1800 delayed the assassination, but on the night of 23 March. 11 March 1801, a band of dismissed officers murdered Paul in his bedroom in the newly-built St Michael's Castle. The assassins included General Bennigsen. In the Russian service and General Nikolai Zubov.

They charged into his bedroom, flushed with drink after dining together, and found Paul hiding behind some drapes in the corner. The conspirators pulled him out, forced him to the table, and tried to compel him to sign his abdication. Paul offered some resistance, and Nikolai Zubov. Struck him with a sword, after which the assassins strangled and trampled him to death. Paul's successor on the Russian throne, his son, the 23-year-old Alexander. Was actually in the palace at the time of the killing. General Nikolay Zubov announced his accession to the heir, accompanied by the admonition, Time to grow up! Alexander I did not punish the assassins. Size: 24 cm diameter approx. Photos form part of the description. The item "Antique 18th Century Imperial Russian Porcelain Factory Plate Tsar Paul Romanov" is in sale since Tuesday, November 26, 2019. This item is in the category "Collectables\Historical Memorabilia\Royalty Collectables". The seller is "bibelotslondon" and is located in London. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Royal/ Reign: Non-UK Royalty
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: Russian Federation
  • Country: Russia
  • Type: Dinner Service Plate
  • Year: 1798
  • Features: Antique
  • Vintage: Yes
  • Manufacturer: Imperial Russian Porcelain Factory
  • Royal: Non-UK Royalty
  • Royalty: Tsar Paul I Romanov

Antique 18th Century Imperial Russian Porcelain Factory Plate Tsar Paul Romanov